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During a Seizure

 

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The most important thing that you can do when your dog has a seizure is to stay calm.  Most seizures are brief, although they may not seem like it while you are watching your precious pup have one.  It's important to remember that most veterinarians believe that dogs, like people, are not in any pain during their seizures.  If they are conscious, they may be confused or scared but they are not in pain.  Your primary goal while they are having a seizure is to be sure that they don't hurt themselves. 

Be sure that your pup is not going to fall down stairs or bump in to any sharp objects while they are having a seizure or when they are recovering from one.

Do not try to restrain their movements

Keep your hands away from your dog's mouth as during a seizure your dog may clench his jaws down hard and hurt you.

Occasionally another dog will attack an epileptic dog during a seizure.  If you have other dogs in the house be sure that you know how they will react to your dog having a seizure and restrain them if necessary.

It may help to talk gently to your dog during a seizure.  Even if he is unconscious the familiar voice may be reassuring as he regains consciousness

It may also help to dim the lights, and keep your voices low so as not to frighten your pup as he regains consciousness.

If your vet has recommended any medication to be given during or after a seizure, have it ready.

When your dog regains consciousness he may want to pace.  This is a normal part of the post ictal period.  Find a place that is as safe as possible and let him pace it off.  This is not part of the seizure, but rather the period of time that your dog's body is returning to normal.  For some dogs this will be very short and for others it can be 24 hours or more. 

Most dogs are very hungry after a seizure and feeding small amounts of food (be sure that he is able to swallow) may help to calm him down.

Berendt, M, Clinical Neurology in Small Animals-Localization, Diagnosis and Treatment
Braund, K G; Clinical Syndromes in Veterinary Neurology
Plunkett, SJ; Emergency Procedures for the Small Animal Veterinarian
Thomas, W B Idiopathic Epilepsy in Dogs, Small Anim Prac Jane 2000,;184-206
Tilley, LP, The 5 Minute Veterinary Consult

Site Map

Home

Primary Epilepsy

Epilepsy Meds and treatments

Secondary Epilepsy

Diet and  Supplements

Common Concerns

 

FAQ'S

 

What Can I do

My Beagles

Radar's Triumph

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Last Updated August 2009