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ANESTHESIA

 

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In general, dogs with epilepsy are not at increased risk for anesthesia or surgery.  Although there isn't a preferred anesthesia that is used for epileptic dogs, some anesthetics should be avoided.  These anesthetics include phenothiazine tranquilizers, such as acepromazine, and ketamine.

When discussing anesthesia, be sure that you talk to your vet about what he/she will use for induction and for maintenance.  Induction refers to the drug that's used to induce sleep initially and maintenance is the drug that's used to maintain the unconscious state.  Many veterinarians prefer to use an injectable drug for induction.  One that is commonly used is Ketamine.  Ketamine is a strong pro-convulsant and should be avoided in epileptic dogs.

Prior to surgery, you should discuss the protocol that your vet favors with him/her.  Although it's reasonable to request that acepromazine and ketamine are not used, it is unsafe to insist that your veterinarian use an anesthesia that is unfamiliar to them.  Adequate monitoring of the patient during and immediately after anesthesia is the most important factor in the safety of your dog.  If your dog has to be hospitalized over night, it's best to be at a hospital that has 24 hour care.

Plumb, DC, Veterinary Drug Handbook

Site Map

Home

Primary Epilepsy

Epilepsy Meds and treatments

Secondary Epilepsy

Diet and  Supplements

Common Concerns

 

FAQ'S

 

What Can I do

My Beagles

Radar's Triumph

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Last Updated August 2009